The 5 Key Learning Techniques That All Coaches Should Master

business coach Dec 20, 2020

      In the professional coaching realm, we call the below learning techniques "roles". All coaches have their own personal mixture of how they help others learn. Understanding which role to take and when is what differentiates a mediocre coach from a good coach. 

      I've noticed some inexperienced coaches in the online world have been discussing the role (singular) of a coach for the last few months. Because of this, I felt it was time to write about it again in hopes that it might clear up the confusion.

 

If you've been through a certification course from an ICF accredited or world-renowned host, you'll know that 'Coaches' (the title) have multiple roles to play at different times. So, what are these roles and how can you start increasing your coaching business by implementing this knowledge?

 

First off, the key in using them is to be transparent with your client. Your consultation and onboarding packet should explain how you use each of these roles clearly. This will help you client not only trust you as an expert more, but also feel safer about what to expect. Second, though there are more than 5 roles that a coach should learn, I'm only going to talk about the top 5 that you should master if you want to start getting more sales and better coaching results.

  1. Teaching
  2. Speaking
  3. Coaching
  4. Mentoring
  5. Facilitating

Let's review what each of these mean and how you can use these roles within your coaching contracts. Please keep in mind, the term of the words below that we are using refers to it's role and action, not the title or profession.

 

1. Teaching

In a coaching setting, I would use the term "teaching" when I'm helping a client learn with a hands-on method. I will use statements, references, examples, and more. This is for any general learning or lesson plans you've created. It is different compared to the role "training", because training involves a specific skill used during a transition phase, or when you are teaching a lesson plan that someone else created. With training there is no creative license to change what you are doing. It's a set plan. Whereas, teaching, you can adjust lesson plans or the learning path as you go.

 

2. Speaking

Even if you don't want to pursue a public speaking career, this role is important in the business building world for coaches at this time. Whether you're doing a Facebook Live lesson, video recording session to teach your clients, or promoting yourself as a guest expert; speaking skills are required to do well. 
Speaking is a great role for coaches because it helps us to simplify and clarify our thoughts. You can always tell a coach who speaks regularly from one who doesn't, by the way they talk!

 

3. Coaching

This will be an easy one because most people understand what this is in terms of a role. Coaching is asking specific and intentional questions that are usually open-ended. This is the hardest role to master because, like chess, it requires you to think about the end thought or decision that you want someone to understand, then back-track the entire conversation, choosing each question that will guide their mind to the answer.

For example, if I want a CEO to learn that they're employees are more important than their customers, I can't just tell him "You're a shitty leader. Pushing your employees to care more about the customer when you don't care about them is creating the drama, low moral, and turn-over rate." He or she will most likely fire me and say, "Don't tell me how to run my company, you don't know anything!"

Statements, or telling someone doesn't help their mind travel the journey of understanding with their emotions as well as asking questions that force their minds to think through that process. This process is called  "re-framing the mind".

 

4. Mentoring

EVERYONE should be mentoring! Let me repeat this important announcement. EVERYONE should be mentoring! I don't care if you're a brand new beginner, or the guru of your field. Mentoring not only helps you learn to lead and influence others (and gives you an avenue to help), it also helps you grow much quicker than normal. Mentoring is similar to the title of coach; you use a mixture of roles to help someone else learn. The difference is that mentoring is usually on a more personal level than coaches are, and it's not usually a paid role. World leading coaches use mentorship as an opportunity for someone to earn.

 

5. Facilitating

This occurs when you are simply helping people learn in a mutual environment without a hierarchy. You are learning along with everyone else many times, but lead the discussions and ensure the environment maintains a positive tone (and stays on time!). This is great for coaches because you can facilitate masterminds to grow and development mindsets surrounding a certain book, course, or topic.

 

Keeping in mind that there are more roles than just these five, I encourage you to think about how you can use these strategically within your coaching. 

 

Let me know what you think of these roles. Which do you use in your coaching already?

 

If you're struggling with your coaching business, join my 1 month course below to bring in the business emergency response team!

 

The Business Medic

The Business Medic

Stay connected with news and updates!

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our team.
Don't worry, your information will not be shared.

We hate SPAM. We will never sell your information, for any reason.